Will losing weight lead to a larger penis?

Originally Published: January 28, 2000 - Last Updated / Reviewed On: January 17, 2008
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Dear Alice,

I wanted to thank you for the information on your site but I have a question. I am a twenty-two-year-old male and am overweight. I have always been overweight. I have a relatively small penis and small scrotum sac (sometimes you cannot see my scrotum). I wanted to know if my weight can be responsible for my small endowment and if by losing weight (I am trying) my penis and scrotum sac may grow.

I do not know if I have a medical problem as to why I am so small. The main reason for my lack of self-confidence is this problem and I wanted to know if there is any hope for me.

Thanks,
Big, yet small

Dear Big, yet small,

You definitely have reason to be hopeful. Although losing weight won't increase the size of your penis, it can provide the genitals with the space and prominence to more confidently say, "Hey, we're here!" A reduction of fatty tissue around the abdomen and thighs may very well make your penis and scrotum look bigger to you and to others.

Big or small, many guys perceive their genitals to be smaller than do the people with whom they share their fruit. Have you tried looking in the mirror head-on and sideways when flaccid and when erect to see if you notice a difference? Some men trim or shave their pubic hair a bit, or a lot, to reveal more of their genitals. Similarly, testicles that "check-in" toward the body aren't attached solely to overweight people. In fact, sexual arousal and cold temperatures are two factors that naturally retract testes in all kinds of men. A cock ring (a snug band or ring) worn around the shaft of the penis and behind the scrotum can help keep the sack from pulling back to its usual position.

Men's and women's genitalia come in lots of shapes and sizes. If you aren't experiencing any problems with your urination, erectile function, ejaculation, or unexplained pain, then you most likely don't need medical attention. However, if you are concerned, a talk with a health care provider in person may provide you with some peace of mind (about your genital health and size).

Getting to the weight you want may fill your basket with much more than a more prominent penis. Your ability to focus on, and enjoy, the pleasure your penis offers you will likely increase. Plus, you may become more comfortable with how you look and feel — with and without clothes on — which can boost your self-esteem and confidence to the point where the size of your penis becomes less important.

Where are you on the weight loss highway? Do you have a health care provider who is helping you with your reduction plan and general wellness? Can you consult with a nutritionist about changing what you eat... and how and when you eat it? In addition to beginning (or continuing) to eat a balanced diet, physical activity can help you with your weight loss goals. To speak with a health care provider or nutritionist, students at Columbia can make an appointment through Open Communicator or by calling x4-2284. Exercising your brain with a counselor about some of your self-image concerns might also help you with your goals. Columbia students can call Counseling and Psychological Services at x4-2878 to make an appointment.

Remember, the size of your penis is less important than the pleasure you (and your partners) receive from putting it into action. Men and women of all (body and genital) shapes and sizes are able to have fulfilling sex lives. Best of luck as you work towards your goals,

Alice