Nutrition & Physical Activity

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Will probiotic-enriched yogurt aid digestion?

Dear Reader,

It's wise to keep a healthy skepticism about the marketing efforts of some of these huge food corporations. Dannon's probiotic-fortified yogurt, Activia, is certainly an example of a highly promoted product. In recent years, the global market for "functional foods," has grown to billions of dollars annually, and since these supplement-food hybrids are appearing on the shelves ever more rapidly, the FDA doesn't have a chance to evaluate all of their claims. While there is evidence that probiotics do help to improve digestion and gastronomic health, it is hard to say that one brand over another is more effective at doing so.

Probiotics, beneficial bacteria that live in the small intestine, are believed to improve digestion. These gut-friendly bacteria actually help you to digest and eliminate your food, while crowding out the unhealthy gut-dwelling bacteria that cause gas, constipation, and bloating. Studies have shown that certain probiotics can help relieve irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhea, constipation, atopic eczema, and may also help protect against various infections and colon cancer. Researchers have found that stressed-out rats have benefited from a serving of water containing certain probiotics. Not a flattering comparison for us people, who might feel like stressed-out rats from time to time, but the findings of the study may be helpful. Probiotics are found in many types of fermented foods, like yogurt, sauerkraut, tempeh, and miso.

Regular yogurt is made using these live cultures, and serves up a healthy serving of them with each spoonful. But your question, is Dannon's Activia more effective in providing these results than regular good old-fashioned yogurt, is one that begs a good answer. Dannon (of course) says yes. Their Activia yogurt contains Bifidus regularis, a probiotic strain trademarked by Dannon that is not in other yogurts, and they claim that this particular strain speeds wastes through the digestive system and improves immunity in the intestines more effectively than other strains.

Dannon says that their Bifidus regularis, "survives passage through the digestive tract, arriving in the colon as a living culture," whereas other cultures can be destroyed by stomach acids and the natural process of digestion. The consumer reports lab has confirmed Dannon's claim, reporting that about three million of the original three billion probiotic organisms in a four-ounce serving of Activia made it through the stomach to the colon.

There is one other difference you mentioned between this yogurt and the others: the price. Activia typically costs more per ounce than regular Dannon yogurt. There are also other brands on the market that offer yogurts containing probiotics that are similar to those in Activia. If you're willing to spoon out the extra cash for yogurts with these particular probiotics and have noticed a decrease in stomach grumblings as a result, it seems like it working for you and might be worth it. However, now that you know that all yogurts contain healthy amounts of probiotics, it might be interesting to see if those regular yogurts feel just as good as the one with all the advertising. Eat up!

Alice

Food coma

Dear Reader,

The symptoms you describe sound like what many people call the "food coma." Often times, after eating a holiday meal, a big dinner or lunch, or even sometimes after meals that didn't seem that big, you may feel a bit drowsy. Some medical conditions can cause this feeling, including anemia, kidney dysfunction, sleep disorders, infections, or an electrolyte imbalance just to name a few. But even people who don't have any of these medical conditions may still feel tired after eating, because this symptom is also a consequence of normal digestion!

Why? Because our bodies spend a lot of energy digesting food. The stomach mechanically churns the food, produces acid to break the food into tiny pieces, and then controls the rate this broken down food can enter the intestines. In the intestines, enzymes use energy to further break down and absorb food particles into the body. For humans, it is normal for the rate of energy use to increase by 25 to 50 percent after a meal. This increased bodily activity could contribute to your feeling flushed after eating.

One explanation for your drowsiness lies in one of the hormones released during digestion — cholecystokinin. Commonly referred to as CCK, this hormone helps make you feel full, but also activates the areas in the brain associated with sleep. So after eating, when CCK levels rise to tell you you're full, you may also start to feel sleepy. Additionally, meals high in carbohydrates can increase the levels of tryptophan (an amino acid) in the blood. In the brain, tryptophan is converted into serotonin (a neurotransmitter that makes people feel both happy and sleepy). This boost in serotonin could also cause someone to feel tired.  

Since you don't feel tired after every meal, you may want to keep a food journal to see what types of food have you craving a post-lunch nap. If carbohydrate-rich or heavy foods like pizza, pasta, or panini slow you down, you could opt for a salad, soup, or sushi on days when you have a lot of work to do in the afternoon. You could also try eating several smaller meals throughout the day, rather than a big lunch, to avoid overwhelming your digestive system.  

Feeling tired after eating is a common experience, and not necessarily linked to a medical condition. However, if you feel your symptoms may be related to a medical problem, it's always a good idea to visit your health care provider, especially if your fatigue begins to seriously impair your ability to get your work done. Students at Columbia can contact Medical Services (Morningside campus) or the Student Health Services (CUMC).

Best of luck in staying alert during your post-meal endeavors,

Alice

Fitting exercise into a busy schedule

Dear A,

It's great to spend some of your free summer time getting more physically fit by starting an exercise program. Indeed, exercise is one component of a healthful routine — especially if you're looking to drop a few pounds. Depending on the types of activities you enjoy, try to get either 30 minutes of moderate exercise (increased heart rate, but still able to carry on a conversation) on at least five days per week, or 20 minutes of vigorous exercise (sweating, breathing heavily) on at least three days per week. There isn't one "quick" exercise that will help you shed pounds, but if you follow the guidelines above, and eat a sensible diet, you'll be on your way to a sustainable, healthy weight for you.

In order to lose weight, most people need a combination of increased activity and reduced caloric intake. Beyond weight control, exercise yields important health benefits, including:

  • reduced blood pressure
  • improved sleep
  • stress management
  • increased level of good cholesterol (HDL)
  • improved blood sugar levels (among numerous other positive effects)

We can't pick and choose where on our bodies we lose fat. Although it's possible to tone and strengthen specific muscles, fat won't be diminished in a specific area by lifting weights or doing certain exercises focusing on that body part. Body fat is decreased when we expend more calories than we take in — but we can't control exactly where fat loss will take place. For instructions on activities that'll help tone and strengthen your thighs, stomach, and hips, check out the Related Q&As listed at the end of this answer.

Since your schedule can be particularly tight, you can incorporate exercise into your daily travels. Biking or in-line skating to your destinations is a possible option, perhaps as a way to keep active during the school year as well. Taking the stairs whenever possible, getting off the bus or subway 1 or 2 stops earlier, parking further away if you drive, or even walking to work or school all contribute to your goal of being healthier by incorporating more movement into your life.

If you're looking for a "total body workout" for the summer, consider swimming — which can also be a cooling activity if your summer is a hot one. Swimming engages many muscles and provides cardiovascular benefits, too. Varying strokes can help work other muscles (such as the breast stroke) or provide greater cardiovascular benefits (such as the butterfly).

There's no secret easy answer, short-cut, or abbreviated workout that will yield magical results. Working each muscle group at least twice a week helps strengthen muscles. Although everyone responds to exercise at different rates, usually one or two sets of 8 to 12 repetitions, working the muscle to fatigue, is usually sufficient for strength building.

To maintain a fit body, it's essential to carve some time into your schedule for exercise and planning healthy meals and snacks -- however, as you can see, it doesn't have to be a lot of time. Scheduling these kinds of activities in your calendar as you would with social activities may help. You can also make plans to exercise with a friend, multi-tasking this way can give you plenty of time to socialize and exercise. Columbia students can score some extra motivation by signing up for  Columbia's CU Move motivational emails. You can also visit the CU Move webpage for other physical activity related information.  Best of luck getting started!

Alice

No time for working out

Dear Aziz,

The job, school, family, dog, and/or bills — the responsibilities of life seem to multiply with each year that we age. As a result, responsibilities to ourselves — health maintenance activities, such as exercise and balanced eating — get pushed off the schedule. From what you've said, it sounds as though unhealthy changes in lifestyle are taking a toll on your self-esteem, body image, and energy level. Your mind and body are calling out for a change in the program! So the question is, how can healthy eating and exercise be incorporated into your day without interfering with your busy schedule?

Fortunately, adopting a healthier eating style — one that emphasizes veggies, fruit, low-fat dairy, lean proteins, and whole grains — does not require hours of preparation in the kitchen. A fast fix for your eating plan can be found in the freezer section of your local grocery store. You can pick up a variety of healthy foods and meals that require little to no preparation. Microwave meals of today are much tastier and healthier than the stereotypical T.V. dinners of the past, and they offer the added benefit of portion control. Paying more attention to what is on your plate and ultimately cutting back on portion sizes is one specific doable step that may help you to get back to your runner's physique.

Take a quick look at food labels to single out healthier choices. Choose convenience meals that contain approximately one fourth to one third of your daily caloric needs and 30 percent of calories from fat, with less than 10 percent of calories from saturated fat. Look for meals that contain less than 800 mg of sodium and at least 4 grams of fiber. Add frozen or pre-cut/washed veggies to these meals and a piece of fruit for dessert. The high fiber content of fruits and vegetables will leave you feeling fuller after you have eaten, without adding many calories.

Errands, such as trips to the grocery, are multitasking opportunities for exercise. You can jog or even ride your bike to work, the grocery, and/or the cleaners, and avoid wasting time in traffic or finding a parking spot. Physical activity will not only help you to get closer to your ideal body shape, but has the potential to relieve stress, increase work productivity, boost after work energy level, and improve sleep quality. The following tips may be useful:

  • Set the alarm 10 minutes earlier and wake up with stretching.
  • Climb at least some of the stairs instead of waiting for the elevator.
  • Take a walk around the office whenever you leave your desk for a bathroom or beverage break.
  • Take a walk to a co-worker's desk instead of calling or sending an e-mail.
  • Multitask by reading or doing research while walking on a treadmill or riding a stationary bike.
  • Use a little extra effort and motion in the chores you do around the house in order to use more calories.
  • Get off the train or bus one stop early or park your car a little further away from home/stores, to get in some walking.
  • Work activity into your social life by meeting friends to go dancing or playing Frisbee in the park.

In addition to the tips listed above, a great source for nutrition and physical activity information is the USDA's MyPlate initiative. This site allows users to tailor much of their information to meet individual nutrition and activity needs. Columbia-affilaited students, faculty, staff, and alumni can participate in the University's physical activity initiative, CU Move. CU Move encourages members of the Columbia community to engage in active lives that include regular physical activity. The program provides participants with motivation, incentives to be active throughout the year, and event calendars with access to plenty of free and low-cost physical activity options on campus and around NYC

After you start making even small changes in your eating plan and include informal exercise in your day, you are likely to begin feeling better. At this point, you may get the urge to do more. In addition, cut back on sedentary activities so that additional time and attention can be given to optimizing your health. With a slow and steady approach you should be able to find the minutes you desire for being more active. Go for it!

Alice

Complete and incomplete proteins in grains and vegetables?

Dear Perplexed by protein,

You're not alone — this can be a confusing subject. First some clarification — a complete protein is a protein that contains all nine essential amino acids (the building blocks of protein, which can only be obtained through eating food). Complete proteins come from animal-based products (meat, poultry, dairy, eggs, fish, etc), soy, and quinoa (a grain). An incomplete protein contains fewer than all nine essential amino acids, however incomplete proteins can be combined in meals to make a complete protein (for example by combining rice and beans or peanut butter and toast). These foods don't need to be eaten at the same time in order to be used by the body to build protein, as once was thought. We just need to eat these complementary proteins within 24 hours. Incomplete proteins come from plant-based foods, such as beans, rice, grains, legumes (other than soy), and vegetables.

Our bodies use amino acids from foods to make proteins. As a matter of fact, the amazing human body manufactures all types of substances — from hormones to muscle tissue, blood cells, enzymes, hair, nails, and many others — given the right proportions of amino acids.

All of the foods you mention contain amino acids, and therefore varying amounts of protein. Just because they don't contain all of the amino acids we need doesn't negate the fact that they contain some protein.

Although protein is a vital nutrient, our bodies don't require quite as much as you may think. The U.S. Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of protein is 0.8 grams/kg per day for adults. This recommendation has been shown to meet the needs of 97.5 percent of the population. For a woman weighing 125 lbs (57 kg), her needs would be met with an intake of 46 grams of protein per day. For a man weighing 154 lbs. (70 kg), his needs would be met with 56 grams of protein a day. A person must be taking in sufficient calories to maintain their weight for these values. Dieters need larger amounts of protein, because some is burned for energy. Athletes require slightly more protein as well.

It's believed that people usually eat a variety of foods, thereby getting the amino acids needed to manufacture complete proteins. Granted, if a person only ate bread, s/he would be missing an essential amino acid. The same would be true if a person only ate vegetables. However, if these vegetarians added legumes to their diet, they would be able to obtain all of the essential amino acids needed to remain healthy. The Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences (which sets the RDAs) spell out the amount of each essential amino acid needed to form complete proteins. However, it isn't necessary to go that far, as long as you are covering your protein needs with a varied eating plan.

To determine your protein needs according to the RDA, divide your body weight in pounds by 2.2, which gives you your weight in kilograms, and then multiply that number by 0.8. Consult the following charts for protein content in various foods. Adjust for the serving size and the number of servings you actually eat.

Animal Sources of Protein Serving Size Protein (in grams)
Meat/Poultry/Fish 3 oz. 21
Cottage cheese ½ cup 14
Milk 1 cup 8
Yogurt 1 cup 8
Cheese 1 oz. 7
Egg 1 whole 6
Egg white only 1 3

 

Plant sources of Protein Serving Size Protein (in grams)
Tofu, raw, firm 3 oz. 13
Legumes: (Black beans, Kidney beans, Chickpeas, etc.) ½ cup 7 – 8
Peanut butter 2 T. 8
Nuts 1 oz. 5
Bread 1 oz. (1 slice) 3
Cereal 1 oz. 3
Vegetables ½ cup cooked or 1 cup raw 3
Pasta or rice ½ cup 3

So, as you can see, it's not difficult to reach your daily protein needs, as long as you include a variety of foods in your daily intake. Incomplete proteins needn't be too much of a concern. Vegetarians who consume complementary proteins are usually able to easily meet their protein requirements. Columbia students who would like more information can meet with a Registered Dietitian who can provide individual counseling and help students understand and meet their unique nutrition needs. If you're interested in learning more about healthy eating habits for yourself, please schedule an appointment. Students on the Morningside campus can contact Medical Services for an appointment and students on the CUMC campus can also schedule an appointment with a Registered Dietitian.

Alice

Salt substitutes

Dear Ashley,

The simple answer to your burning question is no, salt substitute will not make you retain water like salt does. As you had mentioned, salt substitute is different from salt because it contains potassium chloride instead of sodium chloride. Sodium chloride is a water-soluble molecule, which means that a high salt intake will cause your body to hold onto excess water. The same is not true of potassium chloride, which hasn’t been shown to cause water retention.

However, salt substitute is not a good option for everyone. Too much potassium in the body can build up in your kidneys and can cause damage. For individuals on certain medications, particularly to treat heart, kidney, or liver conditions, using potassium chloride may contribute to potassium retention. For these folks, salt substitutes are not recommended.

So, what are some other options for reducing your salt intake? Try experimenting with your cooking (or maybe start cooking more often — over 75 percent of the salt we eat comes from processed foods and eating out!). Instead of adding salt to your food, try using lemon juice, garlic, or garlic powder. Dress up your meals with fresh herbs like rosemary, tarragon, mint, or sage, and expand your horizons with spices like peppercorn, chili, and paprika.

It's also a good idea to play close attention to food labels. If a product is labeled “sodium free” or “salt free,” this means it contains less than 5mg of sodium per serving. “Reduced sodium” means that the product contains at least 25 percent less sodium than the regular version. But buyer beware: some products still have very high levels of sodium to begin with. For example, a cup of reduced sodium chicken soup might be labeled “low sodium,” but that reduction could be from 500mg to 300mg, which is still a lot of sodium for one serving! “Lite” means that the product contains at least 50 percent less sodium than the regular version, and “no salt added” or “unsalted” means there hasn’t been any extra salt added. But again, beware: sodium doesn’t only come from salt; many other ingredients are also high in sodium. Try to steer clear of products that include ingredients like monosodium glutamate (MSG) and baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).

As you explore your new food choices, you can check out the Get Balanced Guide for Healthier Eating for tips on healthier eating. You might also consider talking with a health professional before making major changes to your diet. If you’re a Columbia student, you can make an appointment to speak with a registered dietitian for nutrition counseling or to speak with a health care provider at Medical Services (Morningside) or the Student Health Service (CUMC)

The good news is that salt is an acquired taste – by slowly reducing the amount of salt in your diet, you will gradually rely on it less. Over time, some salted foods might even taste too salty for you!

Alice

Does caffeine affect athletic performance?

Dear Reader,

Your coach and captains may not be correct. Several studies, under various conditions, suggest that consuming caffeine prior to physical activity has no additional effect on sweat rates, total body water loss, or negative effect on athletic performance as compared to non-caffeinated products — and it may provide a boost for you out on the soccer field!

Caffeine has been considered an ergogenic aid — a drug that increases performance as a result of the physiological effects it has on the body. While the exact mechanism isn't known for sure, some researchers believe that caffeine stimulates earlier and greater fat burning during exercise. This would help preserve the body's store of glycogen (the fuel muscles use) so that a person could exercise longer before feeling exhausted. This theory supports findings that caffeine improves performance in endurance events, such as long distance running and/or cycling. A review of literature on the effects of caffeine in short-term and high-intensity exercise concludes that the substance may also aid athletes’ performance in team sport activities that requires repetitive sprinting (like soccer) if ingested before the activity. Others believe that the stimulant effect of caffeine may help with alertness, mental clarity, and overall mood, all of which could help during a workout. For more information, check out Energy drinks and weight loss from the Go Ask Alice! archives.

However, caffeine can affect people in different ways. While some people might notice a performance boost, others might suffer from dizziness, headaches, loss of coordination, abdominal cramps, or nausea — definitely not desirable on game day. Caffeine can also interfere with sleep patterns; overuse might mean that you're not well-rested enough when it comes time to play.

Do you notice that you experience some of these issues when you add caffeine to your diet? If so, you might want to opt out and focus your efforts on proper training, rest, and nutrition for optimal performance. If you don’t, you can rest assured that caffeine does not seem to cause excessive dehydration (though make sure to drink plenty of water and other non-caffeinated drinks, too) and may actually be of benefit when you’re on the field!

Alice

Breakfast: The first chance to fill your tank

Dear Reader,

Regardless of your activity level, breakfast is an essential part of a healthful lifestyle and is also important for maintaining energy all day long. The motto here is anything for breakfast is better than nothing at all. Think of your body as a car and food as gas. Without gas, your car cannot get from one place to another.

The rate at which your body uses calories for energy is known as metabolism. Think of metabolism as the motor of your car. Metabolism is directly related to energy levels, so the higher your metabolism, the more energy you have throughout the day. When you are sleeping, your body naturally decreases its metabolism. When you wake up, there is an increase in metabolism, which peaks by noon. How much energy you have during this time is contingent on how much food calories your body has to use for energy. Breakfast becomes the first stop to the gas station before your road trip. So basically, eating breakfast actually helps maintain high energy levels throughout the day. In fact, the more hearty a breakfast you have, the more your metabolism motor will roar!

You do have to stick to some guidelines, of course, to promote optimal energy.

Calories

The best range of calories for breakfast is between 350 to 500. Below 350, your body will not fulfill the requirements for morning energy usage; above 500, your body may store unneeded calories as fat.

Balance

Plan and eat a balanced breakfast meal including complex carbohydrate, protein, fat, and a fruit or vegetable.

Quantity to Aim for

  • 1 to 2 servings of complex carbohydrates. One serving equals 1 piece of bread, ½ cup of cooked oatmeal, 1 cup of dry cereal, 1 English muffin, ½ bagel, ¼ cup of granola, 1 small muffin.
  • 1 serving of protein. For example, 1 cup of yogurt, ½ cup of cottage cheese, 1 ounce of cheese, 1 large egg, 2 ounces of smoked salmon, 1 cup of milk or soy milk, 2 tablespoons (T) of peanut butter, or ¼ cup of nuts or seeds.
  • 1 serving of fat. E.g., 1 teaspoon (t) of butter, 1 t of oil, 1 tablespoon (T) of cream cheese. But check your protein and carbohydrates for fat, there's no need to add extra if you have a serving of fat in your granola or omelet.
  • 1 serving of a fruit or vegetable. That is, 1 medium piece of fruit, 1 cup of cut fruit, ¼ cup dried fruit, 6 ounces of fruit juice, 1 cup of raw or ½ cup of cooked vegetables, 1 cup of vegetable juice.

Some examples of energizing breakfast meals include:

Meal Equal to
2 pieces of toast
2 T of peanut butter
1 medium banana
2 servings of complex carbohydrates
1 serving of protein
1 serving of fat
1 serving of fruit

½ bagel
1 T of cream cheese
2 ounces of smoked salmon
½ cup of sliced tomatoes

1 serving of complex carbohydrates
1 serving of fat
1 serving of protein
1 serving of vegetables

1 cup of cooked oatmeal with
1 cup of 2 percent fat milk
¼ cup of raisins
2 servings of complex carbohydrates
1 serving of protein
1 serving of fat
1 serving of fruit
1 small muffin
1 cup of plain low fat yogurt
1 cup of orange juice

1 serving of complex carbohydrates
1 serving of fat
1 serving of protein
1 serving of fruit

As you see, there are many delicious ways to get from point A to point B every morning. Imagine your surprise when you see the results with more energy!

Alice

Is canola oil dangerous or is this another urban legend?

Dear Confused,

Canola oil comes from a hybrid plant developed in Canada during the late 1960s to early 1970s using traditional pedigree hybrid propagation techniques (not genetically modified) involving black mustard, leaf mustard, and turnip rapeseed. The original rapeseed plant was high in erucic acid, which is an unpalatable fatty acid having negative health effects in high concentrations. Canola oil contains less than 1 percent erucic acid. In fact, another name for canola oil is LEAR (Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed) oil.

Your confusion about canola oil's safety is understandable. While the Internet can be a great source of information, many rumors and urban legends have circulated on web sites and been passed along in e-mails. Urban legends usually warn of dire consequences from something perfectly innocent; they often relate a story about someone who had such a terrible experience with something, yet that person almost always remains anonymous. These often frightening stories or accusations usually lack enough detail to make scientific, logical evaluation of the claim. The scare tactics of canola oil fit into this scenario.

Some of the information circulating on the Internet states that canola oil causes endless maladies: joint pain, swelling, gum disease, constipation, hearing loss, heart disease, hair loss... the list goes on and on. Canola oil has undergone years of extensive testing to assure its safety. In truth, canola oil contains essential fatty acids that our bodies need and cannot make on their own. Over 90 percent of the fatty acids present is the long chain unsaturated variety that has been proven beneficial to health.

It has also been claimed that canola oil is used in making mustard gas, a poison. This is totally untrue. Actually, mustard gas doesn't even come from the mustard plant; it was so named because it smells similar to mustard. Canola oil has allegedly been used as an industrial lubricant and ingredient in fuels, soaps, paints, etc. The truth is that many vegetable oils, such as corn, soybean, and flax, are also used in these applications. That doesn't make those oils unhealthy or dangerous. Canola oil has also been accused of killing insects, such as aphids. Again, all other oils can do the same, not by poisoning insects, but by suffocating them.

In China, rapeseed oil cooked at very high temperatures was found to give off toxic emissions. In the U.S., the combination of refined oils, added antioxidants, and lower cooking temperatures prevents this from occurring. In China, the oil contains contaminants, is not refined, and has no antioxidants. Some people have blamed the Canadians for paying the United States government to have canola oil added to its GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) list. There is absolutely no evidence of this.

As you can see, misinformation can be used to scare people. Good thing you knew where to turn! For more information on canola oil, you can check out the Canola Council of Canada web site.

Alice

December 17, 2012

520285
Why ingest erucic acid when you don't have to? I'll stick with my organic macadamia/olive oil.
Why ingest erucic acid when you don't have to? I'll stick with my organic macadamia/olive oil.

December 11, 2012

519994
I wouldn't eat it.
I wouldn't eat it.

Kickstart for getting healthy eating and exercise plan in gear?

Dear In dire need of a diet/workout routine,

While you may be low on motivation right now, don't fret; it's never too late to get back on track.

Instead of thinking about the negatives related to lack of exercise and poor diet (excess weight, feeling sluggish), thinking about the positive benefits of healthy exercise and eating patterns may help your motivation return. Exercise and a healthy eating plan can help promote long-term health, but they also have more immediate effects. Exercise helps relieve stress and causes the brain to release mood-improving compounds called endorphins. Time spent on exercise is time spent on you, time for you to consider the issues of the day or to simply clear your head. Working out improves sleep quality, so we have more energy to take on work, school, and the next workout. In the past, what positives have you experienced from exercising and eating well?

Having established some pros, you may want to consider the barriers that are keeping you from eating healthily and doing regular physical activity. One example might be that you don't see healthy lunch options at your workplace or school. Another could be that some fitness center memberships are too pricey. What are all the barriers you can think of? (Hint: start writing them down!) Once you know what you're up against, you can brainstorm solutions and take a step-by-step approach to implement your solutions. For example, with the lunch time conundrum, would it work to pack a healthy lunch two or three times per week? Or could you start to scour the menu and deli shelves for healthy options that may be hidden away? Some folks find that rewards are part of the solution. What are some non-calorie rewards that would give you the incentive you need to stay active and eat well?

Feeling sluggish can be related to giving your body more fat, sugar, and calories than it needs. An energy boosting, balanced diet includes plenty of fruit, veggies, low-fat dairy, lean proteins, and whole grains. Look at the Related Q&As listed below, or visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics or Choosemyplate.gov web sites for tips and guidelines that will help you to put together a healthy and tasty eating plan. As you change your eating patterns, you may even chart your moods in a daily organizer, to see the foods that are making a difference.

Another great way to get back on track with exercise and healthy eating is to gain the support of an ally. Working out with a buddy will make it easier and more enjoyable, and will keep you accountable for those days when you want to skip your exercise. By varying the time of your workout and/or the activity you do, you can prevent getting bored with your same old routine. Sharing a home-cooked meal with a friend can be fun and healthy.

If you prefer, you could also get a professional perspective. Columbia students can schedule time with a trainer at Dodge Fitness Center. For healthy meal planning, Columbia students can set up an appointment with a registered dietitian by contacting Medical Services (Morningside) or the Student Health Service (CUMC). You can also participate in Columbia's physical activity initiative by joining CU Move. CU Move encourages members of the Columbia community to engage in active lives that include regular physical activity. The program provides participants with motivation, incentives to be active throughout the year, and event calendars with access to plenty of free and low-cost physical activity options on campus and around NYC. If you are not part of the Columbia community, you likely have personal trainers at your university fitness center, local gym, or YM/YWCA.

Be realistic, have fun, take small steps toward your goals, and you'll be on your way to getting big rewards!

Alice

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